Books to Read Someday

Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go.

From the Apr 11 (2005) New Yorker review by Louis Menand:

Ishiguro does not write like a realist. He writes like someone impersonating a realist, and this is one reason for the peculiar fascination of his books. He is actually a fabulist and an ironist, and the writers he most resembles, under the genteel mask, are Kafka and Beckett. This is why the prose is always slightly overspecific. It’s realism from an instruction manual: literal, thorough, determined to leave nothing out. But it has a vaguely irreal effect.


Peter Abrahams’s suspense novel Oblivion

A new thriller from an unheralded master of suspense (says Joyce Carol Oates).

Oates reviews in the Apr 4 (2005) New Yorker.

The protagonist is a forty-two-year-old Los Angeles private detective named Nick Petrov, who, at first unknowingly, suffers from a form of brain cancer (“glioblastoma multiform”) whose symptoms he attempts to rationalize or conflate with the progress of his current investigation. …”Oblivion” immerses us in Petrov’s assailed consciousness as he navigates his way through a Dali landscape of baffling clues, memory lapses, and visual hallucinations in an attempted reconstruction of personality that is simultaneously a search for a missing fifteen-year-old girl: “Find the girl and live.”


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